Expert Health Articles

  • Humor
    We all laugh because humor feels good and brings people together, but did you know it has many health benefits? Researchers have studied laughter, along with positive emotions, and found that laughter and lightheartedness can be a natural medicine for many conditions. Gina Bailey, BSN, RN discusses the health benefits of humor in this Weekend Doctor column
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  • Burning, Tingling or Numbness in Your Feet Could Signal a Serious Diabetes Complication
    November is Diabetes Awareness Month and more than 30 million Americans are living with diabetes. Peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage in the feet, can be one of the most common complications of the disease. Thomas Vail, DPM shares tips to prevent peripheral neuropathy in this Weekend Doctor column
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  • Hematuria
    Hematuria, an abnormal presence of blood in the urine, can be alarming to find, especially if it presents itself with no symptoms. Andre Gilbert, MD discusses the symptoms and testing for hematuria in this Weekend Doctor column
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  • When Should I be Screened for Cancer?
    The number one reason to be screened for cancer is to find it in its earliest stages and have a greater potential for cure. In this Weekend Doctor column, Brianne Hottinger, BSN, RN, OCN, CBCN, TTS shares latest cancer screening guidelines
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  • The Dangers of E-Cigarettes
    Media reports have recently warned consumers to stop using e-cigarettes immediately. Many people are experiencing illness linked to e-cigarettes, including death. Angel Mercer, licensed social worker and tobacco treatment specialist, explains how e-cigarettes work and the dangers of vaping in this Weekend Doctor column.
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  • My Achy, Breaky…Back
    With the growing concern about the long-term consequences of opioids, new interventions for pain relief have become a more appealing substitute for medication. Andrius Giedraitis, MD, of Pain Management Specialists of Blanchard Valley, discusses safe pain management procedures.
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  • Do Antibiotics Increase the Risk of Clostridioides Difficile?
    When taking an antibiotic, the “good germs” in the intestines can be killed off, making it easier to become infected with a Clostridioides Difficile (C. diff). Lisa Shaheen, RN, discusses how antibiotics increase the risk C. diff infections in her Weekend Doctor column.
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  • Management of Diabetes
    “While there is not cure for diabetes, keeping blood glucose levels near normal, taking medication and keeping a healthy diet are key in managing your diabetes and living a healthy life.” Ross Ellerbrock, Pharm. D., discusses the history of insulin and managing both types of diabetes.
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  • What is Telehealth?
    Today, there are roughly seven million older adults striving to be independent yet have difficulty leaving home. With the use of Telehealth, providers can deliver a wide range of services to patients within their homes. In her Weekend Doctor column, Michelle Kindle, RN from Bridge Home Health & Hospice discusses the expanding use of Telehealth.
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  • Understanding Chronic Pain
    With Chronic Pain affecting over 100 million Americans, it is important to fully understand the definition and effects it can have. Those who are suffering from chronic pain experience constantly feeling an ache ranging from mild to severe. Dr. Thomas Kindl gives information on the signs and symptoms of chronic pain in his Weekend Doctor column.
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  • Intubation vs. Tracheostomy
    What comes to mind when you hear a physician say, "your loved one needs to be intubated or they need a tracheostomy?" It is important to understand the purpose of each and how they differ.
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  • Home Health Care May Be Right for You
    Home Health services are available to those facing many different types of health conditions that make it difficult to leave home. Maybe you or a loved one is newly diagnosed with diabetes, symptoms of your COPD are worsening, or you require medication assistance. Home health focuses on helping you get better by regaining your independence and becoming as self-sufficient as possible A variety of educational information and tools are utilized to help you maintain and improve your current condition or level of function to reduce decline and remain at home.
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  • A new option for knee pain: Radiofrequency ablation
    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a common interventional procedure, typically performed on the nerves in your spine. In the past few years, pain specialists have begun performing a modified version of this procedure on other joints like the knee. Pain relief may last from nine months to two years. Talk to your physician to find out if you are a candidate for RFA.
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  • HPV Prevention Through the Gardasil 9 Vaccine – Allison Westcott, MD
    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Over 14 million new cases occur in the U.S. yearly. While there is no cure for the HPV virus, there are effective vaccines available for prevention. The prevention and symptoms of HPV can be treated with the Gardasil 9 vaccine.
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  • Sunscreen: What you need to know
    Summer is a time of enjoying your time out in the sun. However, the number of newly diagnosed skin cancers is rising at an alarming rate. Therefore, it is important to protect your skin from Ultraviolet (UV) radiation through photoprotective clothing and proper use of sunscreen. You should always wear a sunscreen, either a chemical filter or physical blocker, with an SPF of at least 30, as well as a lip balm with SPF 15 or higher. For more information or tailored recommendations, visit your local board-certified dermatologist.
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  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Irritable bowel syndrome is the most common diagnosis made in gastroenterology practices. Approximately 10 to 15 Americans suffer from IBS, but there is no need to suffer in silence. There are a variety of treatment options, but unfortunately there is no known cure.
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  • Lupus
    Lupus is a systemic autoimmune disease that occurs when your body’s immune system attacks your own tissues and organs. There is no single test that can diagnose lupus, as there are a wide range of symptoms that vary from case to case. While there is no known cure, there are treatment options for symptoms that can help patients cope.
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  • Cologuard Test
    As a second-tier alternative to colonoscopy, the Cologuard test allows patients to screen for colon cancer and polyps in the comfort of their own home. This test involves collecting and packaging a stool sample, then sending it for evaluation. The results are usually reported to the ordering physician in a couple weeks.
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  • Code Status
    A living will is in effect when you can no longer make any health care decisions on your own. A code status is a decision you can make today. There are three different types of codes: full code, DRN-CCA (comfort care arrest) and DRN-CC (comfort care). Speak with your physician and your family about your wishes.
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  • Health Care and Human Trafficking
    Unfortunately, human trafficking occurs all over the country and beyond. Since medical care becomes necessary for trafficked victims for a variety of reasons, medical professionals are in a position to identify this patient population. There are several signs that an individual is being trafficked, and it is crucial for health care professionals to follow protocol if a patient presents these signs.
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  • Dementia Signs and Symptoms
    Dementia is a general term used to describe various symptoms of cognitive decline. There are many symptoms of dementia, and the earlier these symptoms are evaluated by a physician, the better. Several different types of dementia exist, so it is important for your physician to complete a proper evaluation before diagnosing. Having a healthy lifestyle may help prevent dementia.
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  • Stinging Insects
    Bees, wasps and other stinging insects can cause mild to severe reactions on our skin. There are ways to avoid these creatures and keep yourself safe. If you are highly allergic, you may want to contact your allergist for treatment options. We need these stinging insects for our food supply, so it is important to learn to live in harmony.
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  • Skin Cancer
    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States. It has two major categories: melanoma and non-melanoma. There are two main types of non-melanoma cancers: basal cell cancers and squamous cell cancers. Several factors may make an individual more at risk of skin cancer than others. It is important to complete monthly self-exams and take precautions when outside in the sun.
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  • Colon Cancer Screening Methods
    Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women in the United States. Fortunately, there are several ways to screen for colorectal cancer. These methods are split into two groups: stool-based tests and visual exams. If any abnormalities appear on any screening, receiving a colonoscopy is important.
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  • Shoulder and Elbow Health Part 2
    Preventative measures can help athletes avoid soreness and damage to the arm and shoulder from throwing. Shoulder and elbow endurance and strength are key components to preventing injury, but preseason throwing programs, other positions played, pitch counts, inning limitations and long toss programs can also be used to avoid damage.
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  • Shoulder and Elbow Health Part 1
    Throughout baseball and softball season, players’ throwing arms are placed under a large amount of stress from frequently throwing and passing the ball. After practice or a game, players should treat their throwing arms through icing and massage to reduce inflammation and speed up recovery time. Listening to the body is important, so players should be careful not to overstress their throwing arms to increase performance levels and reduce the likelihood of injury.
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  • Hepatitis A: Not the 'A' You Want
    Outbreaks of hepatitis A take place across the country. This condition is a vaccine-preventable liver disease, usually spread when a person ingests food or beverages contaminated by the stool of an infected person – one example of the importance of hand-washing! Hepatitis A can also be spread via sexual intercourse, and some individuals are more at risk than others. Be aware of the signs and symptoms of hepatitis A and be sure to speak with your physician about whether you should receive the vaccine.
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  • Female Athlete Triad
    One challenge most female athletes face while training is how to properly fuel with food. Doing so incorrectly may lead to the “female athlete triad,” which is defined as a medical condition involving long-term calorie or energy deficiency with or without disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and diminished bone mineral density. These three components do not often present themselves at the same time, but through education and prevention, female athletes can avoid the female triad with proper nutrition.
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  • Harmful Effects of Marijuana Use During Pregnancy and Breastfeeding
    Most people are aware of the adverse effects of smoking cigarettes or drinking alcohol during pregnancy. However, many remain unaware of the dangers of utilizing marijuana during pregnancy and while breastfeeding. Marijuana is legal in many states, but using it during pregnancy may result in higher risk pregnancies, developmental and/or behavioral problems for the child, and other consequences.
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  • Seasonal Allergies: A Month-by-Month Guide
    Seasonal allergies are often lumped into one category, but each season has unique allergens. Spring allergies primarily result from tree pollen and anemophilous plants, whereas summer allergies usually result from grass pollen. In the fall, many people claim to suffer from “hay fever,” but this condition is usually due to ragweed pollen rather than hay exposure. Winter months have less allergen threats, but mold spores may cause flare-ups.
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