Expert Health Articles

  • What is an Advanced Practice Provider?
    Have you seen your nurse practitioner, certified nurse midwife, received anesthesia from a nurse anesthetist or heard of clinical nurse specialists working to improve healthcare lately? If so, you are already familiar with advanced practice registered nurses, (APRNs) or advanced practice providers. We are becoming more and more prevalent in the healthcare industry and provide just as exceptional care as our fellow physicians. Our presence often makes health care more accessible to you.
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  • Digital Well-being for Parents
    Balancing the demands of caregiving with other life responsibilities is challenging for many parents. Many things need our attention, and we can be easily distracted by a phone alert or lose track of time scrolling through social media. Many parents’ lives have become even more digitally connected during the pandemic. This can have an impact on the health of families.
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  • Spending Time Outdoors Promotes Good Mental Health
    Spending time outdoors can positively affect mental and physical health. From improving mood to increasing activity levels, nature can nurture us.
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  • What You Can Find on a Continuum of Care Campus
    A continuum of care campus is a retirement community for seniors 55 and older. The campus fully encompasses the care needed at each stage of life and allows residents to age in place. As you get older, your body changes and some physical tasks become a chore and maintaining a home becomes daunting. Inevitably, aging brings changes to your health and lifestyle. The time arises to look at other living options, and this is when a continuum of care campus becomes important while you are still active and independent.
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  • The Importance of the Routine Fetal Anatomy Ultrasound
    Ultrasound is an imaging modality that uses sound waves transmitted into the body to create a picture of internal structures. Ultrasound can be used to image a baby developing inside the womb and has become a routine part of prenatal care. Most patients will get at least two or three diagnostic ultrasounds throughout their pregnancy.
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  • What the Updated CDC Guidelines Mean For You
    Last week the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its guidelines for COVID-19 recommendations. This is the first major update since the early days of the pandemic, and it signals an evolution in both the disease and our responses to it.
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  • Lawnmower Safety
    In the spring and summer, you often hear the familiar humming sound of lawnmowers. These common machines that are used multiple times each week by teenagers and adults present a danger to children. Every year, more than 9,000 children are injured by lawnmowers in the United States.
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  • Platelet-Rich Plasma Treatment for Chronic Musculoskeletal Conditions
    Many people suffer from chronic musculoskeletal conditions, such as tendinitis and osteoarthritis. There is a new treatment available that research has shown to be effective in treating chronic musculoskeletal conditions: platelet-rich plasma (PRP) that may be able to avoid or delay surgery and many of these conditions.
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  • Public Pool Safety
    Everyone loves to take a dip in the pool, especially during the dog days of summer! While swimming is a great way to play, exercise and cool off, there are certain things to keep in mind. More than 1,000 children die each year from drowning, and many others suffer life-changing injuries. Help protect your family by using the following safety tips when swimming in public pools.
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  • Stroke Symptoms
    You may have heard the phrase “time is muscle,” which refers to being evaluated quickly for a heart attack in order to use a catheter to open a blocked blood vessel and prevent heart damage. Likewise, the same principle applies in the case of a stroke.
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  • Diabetic Foot Infections
    Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is an epidemic that results in numerous complications, hospitalizations and deaths worldwide. Diabetes occurs when your body is not able to process and use glucose (sugar) from food. This results in too much glucose accumulating in your blood stream. This can have negative effects on many different organs and parts off your body.
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  • Social Determinants of Health
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  • Golf Injury and Prevention for All Ages
    Whether you and your child play golf to relax on the weekends or to be competitive, a risk of injury exists just like in other sports. It is important to take precautions against getting hurt and to seek medical attention in the case of injury.
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  • A Closer Look at Having a Penicillin Allergy
    Do you have a penicillin allergy? Even if you were allergic, you may not be any longer!
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  • What You Need to Know About Molluscum Contagiosum
    Despite its big, scary-sounding name, molluscum contagiosum is a common and relatively harmless skin condition seen in many children. It comes in the form of bumps that range in size from a pinhead to a pencil eraser. The bumps are caused by a skin virus and appear as painless domes that are typically flesh-colored, although they may develop a white center and/or redness around the edges. The telltale sign of molluscum contagiosum is a small dimple (umbilication) on top and near the center. Although one bump may appear alone, they are often seen in clusters or scattered on different areas of the skin.
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  • What is Monkeypox?
    Just when we think we are turning the corner on COVID-19, despite its numerous variants, another infection is causing headlines. Monkeypox … what is it? Where did it come from? How does it spread? Is there a need to be worried?
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  • Sleepwalking and Talking: What You Need to Know
    We know sleep is important for everyone, especially children as they continue to grow and develop. But does your child walk in their sleep? Or maybe talk in their sleep? Is there a reason to be concerned about sleepwalking and sleep talking?
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  • Preparing for a Total Joint Replacement
    Often a patient has been diagnosed with severe osteoarthritis of a large joint (hip, knee, shoulder) and among treatment options discussed, joint replacement surgery may be considered. Typically, a joint replacement is reserved for the treatment of severe osteoarthritis when non-surgical treatments are no longer working. Once a patient has met with their orthopedic provider and decided a joint replacement is the right treatment option for them, there is preparation that can be done. This preparation is crucial to joint replacement success.
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  • Toddler Snacking: How Not to Ruin Dinner
    For toddlers, snacking is a very important part of the day. Unlike adults, they need to eat more frequently to maintain their energy levels. Healthy snacks help control toddler hunger while providing a nutritious boost, but how can parents ensure their little ones will still be hungry for dinner after a day of snacking? Here are some tips to help structure your toddler’s diet and not spoil their dinners.
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  • Continuous Glucose Monitoring
    CGM stands for Continuous Glucose Monitoring, the newest and best way for people with diabetes to monitor their glucose levels. Simply put, a CGM is a patch that you can wear on your skin that allows the user to see their blood glucose level consistently, in real time.
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  • File Preparation for Medical Visits
    One of my friends asked the other day about how he could file his advance directives, specifically durable power of attorney and living will, with the hospital to be used in emergencies. In addition, there are many different pieces of information that would be helpful whenever someone comes to a hospital, emergency room or sees a physician.
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  • The Importance of Handwashing
    We know that bacteria and viruses cause fever and death. We also know the simple act of handwashing continues to be a powerful way to protect ourselves from infection. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly two million young children die each year from illnesses that can be prevented by washing hands with soap and water.
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  • Cough Talk
    Right now, there is probably at least one person in your household that has a cough. Coughs are often associated with the common cold and there is little you can do, other than try to ease the symptoms. However, a lot of coughing, especially in babies under four months old, could be a sign of a serious illness.
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  • All About a Baby's Soft Spot
    You may have noticed one or two areas on your baby’s head that do not feel like they contain a bony covering. These are your baby’s soft spots, or fontanelles. Babies have two fontanelles. One is located near the front of their heads. This is the larger of the two fontanelles and is called the anterior fontanelle. The other fontanelle is much smaller and located near the back of the head. This is the posterior fontanelle.
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  • Focusing on Self Care During Compassion Fatigue
    The past two years have been extremely difficult for most of us. First responders, healthcare workers and mental health professionals have been affected greatly, some in similar ways as the general population, yet, for some, more impacted. We are seeing significant compassion fatigue in these fields. Compassion fatigue is defined as a condition characterized by emotional and physical exhaustion leading to a diminished ability to empathize or feel compassion for others.
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  • Hospice Volunteering and Its Benefits
    Hospice volunteers are an essential part of the hospice philosophy, which is comfort and dignity. Hospice clinicians and volunteers work together to offer a holistic approach in caring for patients and their loved ones, meeting the medical needs, while also providing emotional, spiritual and social support. Hospice volunteers help provide patients and families with compassionate care during their end-of-life journey.
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  • Has My Bladder Fallen?
    Have you started to notice something bulging at the opening of your vagina? Have you noticed changes with how your bladder functions or difficulty with intercourse? If you answered yes to either of these questions, then you may be experiencing a very common problem called pelvic organ prolapse. Pelvic organ prolapse is basically a hernia of the pelvic organs to or beyond the vaginal walls.
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  • Overactive Bladder
    Are you always running to the restroom? Do you plan your daily activities around knowing where bathrooms are located? Do you struggle with leakage of urine? If so, you may have overactive bladder (OAB).
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  • Generativity in Retirement
    We work hard through a 30-plus year career. We contribute to 401k or look forward to that pension. Retirement happens and then we feel freedom and bliss right? Not necessarily. Recent studies have shown as much as a 40 percent increase in depression after retirement.
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  • Bunions
    A bunion (also known as hallux abducto valgus) is a bump on the inside of your foot at the big toe joint. The bump is not an enlarged bone, but rather an abnormal bend of the first metatarsal bone on the inside of your foot. In addition to the bump, the big toe also begins to drift toward the other toes, which can cause them to bend as well. Bunions can be hereditary, they can develop overtime due to biomechanical issues of the foot, they can be caused by systemic medical issues or they can be caused secondary to trauma to the big toe joint.
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